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CoRE History

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CoRE History

Founded in the mid-19th Century as the Dresden Works, the site originally formed part of a large china manufacturer  situated on either side of Chelson Street.

The Enson site originally accommodated the factory’s slip-making, finishing and packing houses, with all other production located on the opposite side of the road.In 1875, the sites were separated to form two independent works, resulting in a major rebuilding programme at the Enson site between 1878 and 1900.

By the 1920s, the factory was known as Delphine Pottery and during World War II was converted into a Government military store.It returned to pottery production in 1948 when it was occupied by the firm of Spencer Stevenson & Co., who produced ‘useful bone china ware’ and renamed the factory as the Enson Works in 1953.

They remained at the site until at least 1963, after which the works was sub-divided between several small businesses. The site declined during the late 20th Century and in 1989 was threatened with demolition. However, the value of the site was recognised and Stoke-on-Trent City Council purchased it in 1998. Its four bottle ovens are now listed buildings and the whole site is protected as part of the Short Street Conservation Area.

3 of the 47 existing kilns in Stoke-On-Trent sit inside our new office and provide a whole new purpose by being turned into meeting rooms, storage space and even a games room!

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